Archives for posts with tag: church

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The legendary figure Pocahontas was born Matoaka in 1595 in Werowocomoco, Virginia. Most people know the Disneyfied version of Pocahontas, the daughter of Chief Powhatan, who spared the life of John Smith, an Englishman who captured Indians whilst trying to take over their land. This has never been verified, much like the exact location of her burial site.

After being captured by the English in 1613, she went on to marry an Englishman named John Rolfe, taking on the moniker Rebecca Rolfe. They had a son named Thomas in 1615.

Pocahontas died at age 22, in Gravesend, Kent, of unknown causes and was buried at St George’s Church.

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This statue commemorates her life.

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I’m so happy to be writing a travel post again, especially one on a country I have wanted to visit for a long time: Norway, land of fjords, lakes and snow-capped mountains, and the most beautiful country I have seen so far, the town of Olden in particular. From above Olden literally looked like a model village, to the point that I thought it was some kind of mirage. Lush green trees crept up the hillsides dotted with colourful wooden houses, with great waterfalls speeding down the mountains.

On the way to the glacier trail I photographed a large turquoise-hued lake that I could have sat next to at all day. I really wanted to find a rowing boat and get out on the water.

I then hiked for 45 minutes uphill past waterfalls, goats and grass-roofed huts to Briksdal glacier. It was my first time seeing a glacier, and it was an impressive sight; they really do look blue close up. At the bottom of the glacier was a small turquoise lake, which looked beautiful next to the rugged landscape, although alarmingly a man who has lived in the town since 1998 informed us that when he arrived in Olden, there was no lake.

An equally pretty place was the small town of Eidfjord, with the opportunity for kayaking and of course more hiking.

The Norwegian landscape was everything I imagined it to be and more, like the Scottish Highlands but even more rugged, with higher mountains and clearer lakes.

I hope you enjoy the photographs.

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Although I wouldn’t consider myself a religious person, I am often drawn to churches and cathedrals. I suppose it helps that these buildings are often some of the most impressive examples of architecture in the world.

When I visited Tiggywinkles recently, I drove through a chocolate box village in Buckinghamshire called Haddenham. I felt compelled to stop and take some photographs of the local church, St Mary’s, which is a beautiful 13th century building situated by a pond.

It was a bright and sunny day, with the smell of freshly cut grass in the air. The pond was busy with wildlife but the rest of the village remained sleepy.

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Yesterday I did something I haven’t done in a very long time: I went to church. I was there for worship but my deity was Marc Chagall, and I had come to admire his stained glass windows in All Saints’ Church in the quaint English village of Tudeley in Kent.

All Saints’ was blessed with 12 windows, meaning every angle of the small church has been decorated by the Russian artist. It is the only church in the world to have all of its stained glass created by Chagall. He designed the windows over a period of ten years in France, and the last window was fitted in 1985 (the first was fitted in 1967).

Ten of the windows are blue-toned, typical of Chagall’s glass. The remaining two are golden. The windows are of varying sizes, the piece de resistance being the huge religious depiction above the altar, with Christ displayed at the top.

I was lucky enough to visit on a very sunny day, allowing the windows to be seen at their full potential. They were resplendent, and the reflections of the vivid colours danced on the walls. If I lived closer I might have to join the congregation.